ca. 1860s, [carte de visite, outdoor view of Methodist church, Denver, Colorado]

Albumen print, Carte-de-visite, mid 1860s With “Methodist Church / Denver, Colorado” written in pencil in a later hand, mount verso.
The first Methodist Episcopal Church was built in Denver in 1860. With the coming of the Civil War the church was left almost empty, and the property was sold in 1862. Sometime after that, a neighbor church, St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral, then called “St. John’s Church in the Wilderness”, was erected at 14th and Lawrence. The image here probably shows that church.

via KaufmaNelson Vintage Photographs
Jan 26, 2014 / 4 notes

ca. 1860s, [carte de visite, outdoor view of Methodist church, Denver, Colorado]

Albumen print, Carte-de-visite, mid 1860s With “Methodist Church / Denver, Colorado” written in pencil in a later hand, mount verso.

The first Methodist Episcopal Church was built in Denver in 1860. With the coming of the Civil War the church was left almost empty, and the property was sold in 1862. Sometime after that, a neighbor church, St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral, then called “St. John’s Church in the Wilderness”, was erected at 14th and Lawrence. The image here probably shows that church.

via KaufmaNelson Vintage Photographs

ca. 1893, [stereograph from the Ferris Wheel], H. H. Bennett

Stereoview through a Ferris wheel at the Chicago World’s Fair. The sensation of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago was the Ferris wheel, the creation of George Washington Gale Ferris, a bridge builder from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The wheel stood 26 stories high and was intended to rival the Eiffel Tower, the centerpiece of the 1889 Paris Expo. For fifty cents, a passenger got two revolutions—first a stop-and-go circuit as people were loaded and unloaded, then a majestic, non-stop revolution.
The wheel was re-erected in St. Louis for the Louisiana Purchase Expo of 1904. It was finally destroyed by a monster charge of dynamite. 

via the Wisconsin Historical Society
Dec 17, 2013 / 3 notes

ca. 1893, [stereograph from the Ferris Wheel], H. H. Bennett

Stereoview through a Ferris wheel at the Chicago World’s Fair. The sensation of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago was the Ferris wheel, the creation of George Washington Gale Ferris, a bridge builder from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The wheel stood 26 stories high and was intended to rival the Eiffel Tower, the centerpiece of the 1889 Paris Expo. For fifty cents, a passenger got two revolutions—first a stop-and-go circuit as people were loaded and unloaded, then a majestic, non-stop revolution.

The wheel was re-erected in St. Louis for the Louisiana Purchase Expo of 1904. It was finally destroyed by a monster charge of dynamite.

via the Wisconsin Historical Society

Nov 5, 2013 / 301 notes

vitorrochawall:

Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris - Henri Labrouste, 1862-1868 (images:www.blaaargh.org)

(via room-of-flint)

archimaps:

One of the domes of the Samaritaine Department Store, Paris
Oct 8, 2013 / 106 notes

archimaps:

One of the domes of the Samaritaine Department Store, Paris

Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you.

Frank Lloyd Wright

(via alittleplaceonmain)

(via ormountedonstrangebeasts)

Jul 16, 2013 / 7,995 notes
martinekenblog:

(via Architizer Blog » Philadelphia Community Rallies to Save Crumbling Frank Furness Church)
Jun 8, 2013 / 30 notes
It is the pervading law of all things organic and inorganic,
Of all things physical and metaphysical,
Of all things human and all things super-human,
Of all true manifestations of the head,
Of the heart, of the soul,
That the life is recognizable in its expression,
That form ever follows function. This is the law
Louis Sullivan, architect (via dontgetsnarky)
Jun 8, 2013 / 16 notes
savage-america:

St. Landry Parish, Louisiana ‘38
Jun 8, 2013 / 25 notes

savage-america:

St. Landry Parish, Louisiana ‘38

May 29, 2013 / 11 notes

McKim, Meade, & White at the behest of Alexander Cassat, original Pennsylvania Station, (built 1910, rebuilt ~1963)

via

May 28, 2013 / 16 notes

"If ever a man was a “rogue architect,” to use the amiable phrase of H. S. Goodhart-Rendel, surely it was Frank Furness, who gave us some of the brawniest and most aggressive buildings of the Victorian era. The roguishness is everywhere: in the muscularity of his brooding and belligerent banks; in his strangely agitated tombs; even in objects that are normally sedate, such as fireplaces and furniture…"

via The New Criterion, “Frank Furness, Rational Rogue,” Michael Lewish